Invited Talk: Envisioning & Shaping Futures: On-Line Teaching and Learning

digital humanities, invited talk, Pedagogy, Presentations, research

I will be presenting at the Ivan Allen College Advance Lunch and Discussion this Thursday, February 28 from noon – 1:30. The overall theme of the discussion is “Envisioning & Shaping Futures: On-Line Teaching and Learning” and I will be talking specifically about using Twitter in the online/hybrid classroom to help bolster discussion and community exchange.

AdvanceLuncheon

Article: Possibly Impossible; Or, Teaching Undergraduates to Confront Digital and Archival Research Methodologies, Social Media Networking, and Potential Failure

digital humanities, Pedagogy, Publications, research

My newest article,  co-authored with Suzan Alteri, titled “Possibly Impossible; Or, Teaching Undergraduates to Confront Digital and Archival Research Methodologies, Social Media Networking, and Potential Failure” is available in Issue 14 of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.  Issue 14 is a Themed Issue on Teaching & Research with Archives.

The Table of Contents is available here: https://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/table-of-contents-issue-fourteen/

Abstract

This article details an undergraduate student research project titled “The Possibly Impossible Research Project,” a collaborative effort between the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature at the University of Florida and the Writing and Communication Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The article outlines the pedagogy behind a multimodal digital research project that provided Georgia Tech students with in-depth instruction into archival research processes while improving the Baldwin’s annotated bibliography. The article then details the process of teaching the course and how students responded to the project both during and after the course. This assignment also offered students an opportunity to uncover and make meaning as researchers in their own right, and to distribute that new knowledge through public facing digital platforms such as Twitter and Wikipedia. The authors conclude that the collaborative project had meaningful impacts on the undergraduate students, the course instructor, the curator of the Baldwin Library, and the larger academic community; further, it can serve as a model for engaging undergraduate students with archival research, analysis, and dissemination. This article outlines the assignment in detail, including the interactive digital scaffolding assignments. The article cites student research journal tweets and final reflective portfolio essays to demonstrate the successful fulfillment of the student learning outcomes.

Exhibit: Communication Through Art

children's literature, Pedagogy, Picture Books, Service

Student work from my Spring 2018 course “The History and Rhetoric of Science Writing for Children” is currently on display on the first floor of Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons.

PictureBooksinCompClass

Code4Lib Presentation: “The Possibly Impossible Research Project”

digital humanities, Pedagogy, Presentations, research

I am presenting today at Code4LibSE 2018 @ The Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library. My presentation today is on a project I completed with my Spring 2018 Georgia Tech course on the History and Rhetoric of Science Writing for Children.

Presentation Slides: “The Possibly Impossible Research Project”: Using Digital Research and Social Media to Teach Archival Research Methods

Text Only Version of Presentation Script

 

Celebrate Teaching Day 2018

Pedagogy, Presentations

This year, for Georgia Tech’s Celebrate Teaching Day, I chose to focus on using social media (i.e. Twitter) to create a public-facing research journal. This exercise was a part of a larger unit asking students to research possibly impossible materials on 19th century female authors of science texts for children, in co-operation with the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature. For more on this assignment, please see the entry for this course in my teaching portfolio.

Screen Shot 2018-04-11 at 2.01.43 PM.png

Georgia Tech Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

digital humanities, Pedagogy, Service

As co-chair of the Curricular Innovation Committee in the Writing and Communication Program, I am helping to organize and plan the campus wide Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon on March 3 from 10am-2pm.

For more information you can follow us on Twitter (@WCP_Innovation) or view the Facebook page.

Georgia Tech Daily Digest article

Wiki_Edit_Women

Wiki_Edit_Women

Demystifying Wikipedia Workshop

digital humanities, Pedagogy, Service

In preparation for the campus-wide Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon on March 3, the Curricular Innovation Committee is hosting a workshop on “Demystifying Wikipedia: Understanding the Logic of How Wikipedia Works” on Thursday, February 16 from 11:00-11:50 am in the Stephen C. Hall building, room 103.

Our guest speaker, Dr. Andy Famiglietti, will talk us through how to work with Wikipedia, both in the classroom and as a part of scholarship/service work.

Wiki_Edit_final Flier

https://map.concept3d.com/?id=82#!m/11005

Experiments in Research Productivity

Pedagogy, Productivity, research, Uncategorized

Maintaining motivation and momentum throughout the summer is a challenge for a lot of academics; we are scattered, somewhat isolated and for those of us not teaching, have large swaths of uninterrupted time. Without the urgency of other work (like grading) or deadlines (most of which come before or at the end of the summer), its easy to get lost in academic rabbit holes or spend more time than necessary tweaking a presentation powerpoint.

I also lately have been searching for an outlet to discuss my research more; while the classes I teach often touch on these topics and I am surrounded by smart, brilliant postdoctoral fellows engaged in fascinating research of their own, I do miss a little bit of the structure of dissertation group meetings and a research advisor to touch base with from time to time. So I’m going to experiment a little with some of the same digital pedagogy tools I’ve been using in my composition courses to help my students with their research projects.

In the Writing and Communication program here at Georgia Tech, the program emphasizes using digital pedagogy to help students adapt their communication skills to a multimodal environment. Using the acronym WOVEN (written, oral, visual, electronic, and non-verbal) to help emphasize a wide variety of communication forms that can help students expand their concept of “English” beyond the 5 paragraph essay for English class and into workplace-ready forms of communication. I have recently been encouraging students to use Twitter as a brainstorming and researching tool (more on that in a later post) and have long used WordPress blogs in place of response papers. I have found that incorporating social media elements into informal writing has helped students feel more comfortable with sharing their “unfinished” ideas and can help a classroom full of disparate personalities come together into a community of scholars, if only for a brief semester. I have found over the past few years of using social media in my composition and literature classrooms that the students who engage with their peers and embrace the informal nature of these assignments often feel more confident in their more formal work, have a deeper and more nuanced set of research questions, and have benefitted from the informal peer review and feedback from their classmates over time, (not just in the formal peer-review exercises in class).

So with all of that in mind, I’m engaging in a couple of social media-based experiments to help me with my own writing. The first, using Twitter, is more motivational/structural. Each work morning, I will tweet a specific goal for the day- given that Twitter is limited to 140 characters, this helps me be clear, concise and specific in setting my goals. I’m also hoping to use the Forest app on my phone/web browser to help me keep track of my focused writing time. By sharing these goals on Twitter each day, as well as the very pretty forest diagrams that demonstrate the time I spent focused on work, I hope to build an accountability system for myself. There are other perks to this system (one which I’ll perhaps discuss in a future post), but on the whole, I see this as mostly a useful exercise to help me keep the ball rolling and to build a demonstrable record of how much I accomplish in the next few months.

The second social media experiment is this. I am adding this active blog section to my professional website in the hopes of giving myself an informal outlet to outline budding thoughts, keep track of progress, and “talk” to fellow scholars, even if there isn’t clear evidence that anyone is reading or talking back (though if you are reading this, feel free to chime in). I’m hoping to post a few times a month (maybe as much as once a week) but mostly when I need some space to think though ideas or start putting words to paper.

Stay tuned to this space for more!