Invited Talk: Envisioning & Shaping Futures: On-Line Teaching and Learning

digital humanities, invited talk, Pedagogy, Presentations, research

I will be presenting at the Ivan Allen College Advance Lunch and Discussion this Thursday, February 28 from noon – 1:30. The overall theme of the discussion is “Envisioning & Shaping Futures: On-Line Teaching and Learning” and I will be talking specifically about using Twitter in the online/hybrid classroom to help bolster discussion and community exchange.

AdvanceLuncheon

Article: Possibly Impossible; Or, Teaching Undergraduates to Confront Digital and Archival Research Methodologies, Social Media Networking, and Potential Failure

digital humanities, Pedagogy, Publications, research

My newest article,  co-authored with Suzan Alteri, titled “Possibly Impossible; Or, Teaching Undergraduates to Confront Digital and Archival Research Methodologies, Social Media Networking, and Potential Failure” is available in Issue 14 of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy.  Issue 14 is a Themed Issue on Teaching & Research with Archives.

The Table of Contents is available here: https://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/table-of-contents-issue-fourteen/

Abstract

This article details an undergraduate student research project titled “The Possibly Impossible Research Project,” a collaborative effort between the Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature at the University of Florida and the Writing and Communication Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The article outlines the pedagogy behind a multimodal digital research project that provided Georgia Tech students with in-depth instruction into archival research processes while improving the Baldwin’s annotated bibliography. The article then details the process of teaching the course and how students responded to the project both during and after the course. This assignment also offered students an opportunity to uncover and make meaning as researchers in their own right, and to distribute that new knowledge through public facing digital platforms such as Twitter and Wikipedia. The authors conclude that the collaborative project had meaningful impacts on the undergraduate students, the course instructor, the curator of the Baldwin Library, and the larger academic community; further, it can serve as a model for engaging undergraduate students with archival research, analysis, and dissemination. This article outlines the assignment in detail, including the interactive digital scaffolding assignments. The article cites student research journal tweets and final reflective portfolio essays to demonstrate the successful fulfillment of the student learning outcomes.